May is Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AANHPI)– a time to recognize the contributions of the AANHPI communities and raise awareness of the issues they face.

Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month originated with Congress like other commemorative months. In 1977, Representative Frank Horton of New York and Edward Koch of New York introduced House Joint Resolution 540 to proclaim the first ten days of May as Pacific and Asian American Heritage Week. Later that year, Senator Daniel Inouye introduced a similar resolution; however, neither resolution passed. So, in June 1978, Representative Frank Horton reintroduced a similar resolution passed by the House and the Senate and signed by President Jimmy Carter to become Public Law 95-419. In 1990, Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Week was expanded to a month when President George H.W. Bush signed a bill passed by Congress, designating May as Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month. 

The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869.

During this month and throughout the year, FERC is celebrating the heritage and culture of the AANHPI community and bringing awareness to issues and challenges unique to their community. We’re also recognizing the incredible achievements and opportunities that have been made possible through the hard work and dedication of those in the AANHPI community.

To learn more about the AANHPI community, please visit the AANHPI resources below.

This page was last updated on May 03, 2022