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Processes

Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal Permitting Processes:
This process includes consulting with stakeholders, identifying security, safety and environmental issues through scoping, and preparing environmental documents such as Environmental Assessments or Environmental Impact Statements. Applicants can choose the Pre-Filing process or the Traditional Process. Read More

Natural Gas Pipeline & Storage Permitting Processes:
This process includes consulting with stakeholders, identifying environmental issues through scoping, and preparing environmental documents such as Environmental Assessments or Environmental Impact Statements. Large projects may also include a preliminary determination based on non-environmental considerations. Certificates are issued by Commission order. Read More

Intervene:
Deciding whether to intervene in a proceeding. View Schematic

Rulemaking Process:
FERC's proposed regulations are developed through the rulemaking process. A petition for a rulemaking can arise from the energy industry, specific companies, stakeholders and the public. Read More

Hydropower Licensing Processes:
Hydropower licensing processes include consulting with stakeholders, identifying environmental issues through scoping, and preparing environmental documents such as Environmental Assessments or Environmental Impact Statements. Licenses are issued by Commission order. Read More

Hydrokinetic Projects:
FERC's process for projects that generate electricity from waves or directly from the flow of water in ocean currents, tides, or inland waterways. Read More

Enforcement:
The Enforcement area has several major processes from how they conduct an audit to how civil penalty are assessed. Read More

Administrative Hearings Process:
Administrative hearings are held to resolve contested proceedings, such as appeals of Commission orders or complaints. Rate cases are set for hearing if proposed rates, terms and conditions have not been shown to be just and reasonable, and may be unjust, unreasonable, unduly discriminatory, or otherwise unlawful. Read More

 




Updated: June 28, 2010